Sunday, March 26, 2017

Spinning Starlight

I love retellings. One of my favorites is Sarah J. Maas's ACOTAR series. The first book is a retelling of Beauty and the Beast, the second a loose retelling of the myth of Hades and Persephone. I loved Marissa Meyer's Lunar Chronicles and their sci-fi take on classic tales. So when I saw R. C. Lewis's Stitching Snow a while back, I was excited to see what other ways these stories could change with a sci-fi lens.

24565038
Retrieved from Goodreads
Liddi Jantzen is set to inherit an tech empire spearheaded by her eight brothers. Her parents died years ago, so it's just been the nine of them. Liddi hates all the attention and hides from media grubs on their family's estate, not understanding why she can't invent the way her brothers do. But then her brothers disappear, and Liddi will do anything to get them back. When she stumbles upon the secret of their disappearance, she finds her voice hobbled so she can't tell the secret, and narrowly escapes to another planet where humans are not the only species and the portals between worlds are thought to be alive. She must work quickly to save her brothers. But without her voice, how can she make people understand what she needs?

I'll say this--interesting premise. I liked the idea of tech being the reason this Little Mermaid lost her voice. And she's certainly a fish out of water on the new planet. She makes lots of cultural mistakes and nearly gets thrown in jail. There are warring factions and some cool science around the portals. And I liked the notion that her planet didn't have a written language anymore. As someone who has a degree in history and works with history books, it was a fun nod to the many cultures with oral rather than written traditions, particularly since Liddi's planet is advanced rather than the usual way of portraying these kinds of cultures as primitive. But. Where I got to know Marissa Meyer's characters very intimately, and the world was very fleshed out, I don't feel like I got to know much about Liddi beyond her love for her brothers and her inferiority complex. There's instalove which always makes me roll my eyes. And it was all resolved so quickly. I guess I had the same problem with this book as I did with Stitching Snow--I wanted it to be longer. When you have these amazing sci-fi worlds you owe it to them to give a ton of detail. So while I really enjoy the spin on classic stories that Lewis does, I want there to be more meat to each of her books.

Goodreads Rating: 3 Stars
Up Next: The Chaos of Stars by Kiersten White

No comments:

Post a Comment